Welcome to our summer intern, Atte Kadoma. Atte just completed her freshman year at Iowa State University where she is working towards a degree in Materials Engineering. We first met Atte in 2014 when she attended ASM-MN Materials Camp as a high school student.  MEE is a corporate  sponsor of Materials Camp and the students spend a day here getting hands-on experience in a materials testing laboratory.  We even found a photo in the Materials Camp photo archives of Atte at the Rockwell hardness tester!

Atte has long been interested in pursuing an engineering degree but said her experience at Materials Camp definitely influenced her decision to choose materials science engineering as her major. She has expressed a particular interest in failure analysis.

We were very pleased to be able to offer Atte an internship this summer and look forward to working with her.

SONY DSC

Rockwell hardness tester at 2014 ASM-MN Materials Camp

 

Filed under: About MEE,

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Senior Materials Engineer, Dan Grice, will be speaking at the Minnesota Microscopy Society Spring Symposium this Friday, May 5th on microbiologically-influenced corrosion.

Although one of the least-known and least-understood corrosion mechanisms, microbiologically-influenced corrosion (MIC) is among the most damaging in terms of total cost to society. Recent estimates indicate that the annual cost of corrosion in the United States is around $300 billion, and as much as 20% of that cost can by attributed to MIC. For the most part, microorganisms do not actually consume the metal, but rather create an environment that fosters the corrosion processes. Microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi, and microalgae, can accelerate the rates of corrosion processes or change the dominant corrosion mechanism through their presence and metabolic processes. MIC has been reported for almost all significant metal alloy systems and in applications including seawater, potable water, hydrocarbon fuels, food processing and sewage. This presentation will cover the mechanism for MIC, some of the significant organisms, methods for diagnosing the problem, and some of the mitigation techniques

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MEE CEO and Principal Engineer, Larry Hanke, will be the keynote speaker at the UK Association of Fire Investigators summer training conference in London, England on July 3, 2017.

Larry and MEE engineer, Neal Hanke, recently presented a similar session at the 2017 International Association of Arson Investigators training conference in Las Vegas.

The following key concepts were covered in their presentation:

  1. A fundamental understanding of how structural and electrical materials behave at elevated temperatures.
  2. How material behaves under stress.
  3. How to evaluate component failures that may contribute to fire and explosion
  4. A better understanding of how to identify electrical arcing
  5. How anomalous material behavior can lead to incorrect conclusions about the conditions during a fire

Larry  has  assisted with the investigation of hundreds of fires and explosions during his 40 year career as a Metallurgical Engineer.  In 1995 he founded Materials Evaluation and Engineering, Inc.  which has become one of the leading material testing and failure analysis laboratory in the Upper Midwest.

Neal  has been conducting materials evaluation investigations and testing with MEE. since 2011. Recently, he has become involved in the research of materials characterization for arc mapping in structural and automotive fires.

Filed under: About MEE,

Failure Analysis Presentation

posted February 2017

Larry Hanke and Dan Grice will be presenting at the  Minnesota Section of ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Spring Symposium on March 15 in Plymouth MN.

Wind Generator Blade Failure

Wind Generator Blade Failure

The title of this year’s symposium is “Failure, Test and Modeling Tools in Engineering Design”. Larry and Dan’s presentation will cover advice on field practices to prepare for failure analysis, laboratory test methods for evaluation of mechanical behavior and corrosion, failure analysis tasks useful for product improvement efforts, examples of the analysis of field failures and laboratory test specimens, and the application of test data to product development.

 

Graphitic Corrosion Case Study

posted January 2017

We were asked to determine the mechanism and possible causes of corrosion of a cast iron sanitary sewer pipe. Metallurgical testing and EDS analysis pointed to graphitic corrosion. With graphitic corrosion there is no reduction in the size or shape of the pipe but the strength of the material is severely reduced.

Cross section of vent pipe.

Cross section of vent pipe.

The Vent Pipe case study explains in more detail how this type of corrosion mechanism is identified, causes and our recommendations to the client.

All of the case studies on our website come from our files. They have been edited to present a more casual writing style than our formal reports, but generally they follow the structure of our reports and give an overview of the findings and conclusions from an investigation.

New P.E. at MEE

posted January 2017

Congratulations to MEE staff member, Neal Hanke, P.E., who just received his professional engineering license. To become licensed, engineers must complete a four-year college degree, work under a Professional Engineer for at least four years, pass two intensive competency exams and earn a license from the state licensing board. To retain their licenses, PE’s must continually maintain and improve their skills throughout their careers. A PE license indicates a commitment to hard work, integrity and dedication to the profession.

Learn more about MEE’s engineering and technical staff on the “About Us” page of our website.

 

 

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Light Microscopy

posted December 2016

Our laboratory at  MEE has a variety of light microscopes with magnifications ranging from 5X to 2400X. Light microscopes aid in low-magnification observation of sample surface features using visible light. The Keyence VHX 1000 is a state-of-the-art digital microscope that captures images with an extended depth of field and allows for 3D measurements of surface features. The laboratory also has a range of stereo microscopes for low-magnification inspection and imaging. The MEE laboratory staff know how to properly prepare and examine samples to obtain the optimum materials characterization data.

Contact us to discuss which evaluation method is best suited to solve your materials-related problems.

Metal sculpture

One of our staff found this metal sculpture on his recent vacation to Italy. Our newest metallurgical microscopist is always on the job. 

Filed under: About MEE, light microscope,

Technical Paper Published

posted December 2016

“Broad Beam Ion Milling for Microstructure Characterization,”  a technical paper authored by MEE staff Larry Hanke, Kurt Schenk and Dieter Scholz, was recently published in the online version of Materials Performance and Characterization.  An abstract of the article is available on the ASTM International digital library site.

Ion beam milling is a unique method of sample preparation that complements and significantly extends the capabilities of the traditional microscopy and metallographic laboratories. Our online Handbook of Analytical Methods for Materials (HAMM) offers basic explanations, typical applications and sample requirements for Ion Milling.

On the Road Again

posted November 2016

Larry Hanke, will be speaking on Forensic Materials Engineering for Product Liability Litigation at the November meeting of  the Metro NY-NJ chapter of ASM International. The presentation will discuss potential materials related problems in product design and manufacturing that can lead to product failures. Failure mechanisms, including fracture and corrosion, as well as the material properties and service conditions that cause these failures will be covered. In addition, he will discuss special considerations for the process of investigating product failures involved in litigation from the materials engineering prospective.

Failure Analysis Society

posted October 2016

The Failure Analysis Society, the newest affiliate society of ASM International, had a launch party last week at MS&T in Salt Lake City. In attendance from MEE were founding members of the society, Larry Hanke, Ryan Haase, and Dan Grice. Joining them in the photo is Dehua Yang another member of the Minnesota Chapter of ASM.

Ryan Haase, Dehau Yang, Larry Hanke, Dan Grice

Ryan Haase, Dehau Yang, Larry Hanke, Dan Grice

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